Monthly Archives: November 2017

I’m Presenting Two Linux Sessions on One Day!

On 12/13 I’m presenting two, back to back, sessions on SQL Server on Linux online. So you can attend from anywhere!

Let’s go through both!

First, on 12/13 at 1PM Central, I’m presenting for the PASS Database Administration Virtual Group here’s my session details:

Topic: Linux OS Fundamentals for the SQL Admin

Registration: You must register if you want to attend. You can register at http://dba.pass.org/. When you register, you will receive a link to the meeting. All attendees will be entered into a raffle for a $25 gift card.

Abstract: SQL Server and PowerShell are now available on Linux and management wants you to leverage this shift in technology to more effectively manage your systems, but you’re a Windows admin! Don’t fear! It’s just an operating system! It has all the same components Windows has and in this session, we’ll show you that. We will look at the Linux operating system architecture and show you how to interact with and manage a Linux system. By the end of this session you’ll be ready to go back to the office and get started working with Linux with a fundamental understanding of how it works.

 

Second, on 12/13 at 2PM Central, I’m presenting at the PASS Marathon: Linux Edition here’s my session details:

Topic: Monitoring Linux Performance for the SQL Server Admin

Registration: You must register if you want to attend. You can register at http://www.pass.org/marathon/2017/december/Registration.aspx.

Abstract: So you’re a SQL Server administrator and you just installed SQL Server on Linux. It’s a whole new world. Don’t fear, it’s just an operating system. It has all the same components Windows has and in this session we’ll show you that. We will look at the Linux operating system architecture and show you where to look for the performance data you’re used to! Further we’ll dive into SQLPAL and how it architecture and internals enables high performance for your SQL Server. By the end of this session you’ll be ready to go back to the office and have a solid understanding of performance monitoring Linux systems and SQL on Linux. We’ll look at the core system components of CPU, Disk, and Memory monitoring techniques for each and look some of the new tools available including new DMVs and DBFS.
Hope to see you online!

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Top 5 Reasons Why I think SQL Server on Linux is Legit

Here are my top 5 reasons why I thing SQL Server on Linux is Legit!

  1. SQL Server on Linux is Fast – Earlier this year SQL Server on Linux posted the fasted 1TB TPC-H benchmark in the world and at the end of October posted the a 10TB result! Check out the results here and some info on how they did it here and here.
  2. It’s tunable – From and OS standpoint, I think the “tunability” of the operating system is more well documented and well known on Linux. Check out Microsoft’s recommendations here and also Redhat’s here.
  3. Features – If you’re a developer in the Linux ecosphere, this is the reason why you’re evaluating using SQL Server on Linux…there’s likely a feature you want…that you can now have. Check them out here!
  4. Enterprise Support – I like cruising around in forums just like anybody else, but sometimes you have to call support to bring in the people that actually wrote the software.
  5. Availability Solutions – SQL Server has a proven track record for availability, those same concepts and techniques apply to SQL Server on Linux. Backups, Availability Groups, and Failover Clusters check it out.
SQL Server on Linux is a new world, learn the operating system, administration fundamentals and more with me at my online course “SQL Server on Linux: Install, Configure, and Manage” at Brent Ozar Unlimited – sign up now here!

Launching SQL Server on Linux in Single User Mode

There was a question this morning on the SQL Server Community Slack channel from SvenLowry about how to launch SQL Server on Linux in Single User Mode. Well you’ve heard everyone say, it’s just SQL Server…and that’s certainly true and this is another example of that idea.

The command line parameters from the sqlservr binary are passed through into the SQLPAL managed Win32 SQL Process. So let’s check out how to do this together…

First, you’ll want to switch to the user mssql and you can do that with this command

bash-4.2$ sudo su mssql –


What’s happening here is we’re using sudo to switch our user’s security context to the user mssql. This is the account that SQL Server normally runs under. That last dash there is to load the mssql user’s shell, rather than ours.
 
Next, we need to launch the /opt/mssql/bin/sqlservr binary with the -m parameter
 

bash-4.2$ /opt/mssql/bin/sqlservr -m 


Here’s the output from the console while SQL Server is starting up. 

2017-11-09 12:53:18.70 Server      Microsoft SQL Server 2017 (RTM-CU1) (KB4038634) – 14.0.3006.16 (X64) 

Oct 19 2017 02:42:29 

Copyright (C) 2017 Microsoft Corporation

Developer Edition (64-bit) on Linux (CentOS Linux 7 (Core))

2017-11-09 12:53:18.70 Server      UTC adjustment: -6:00

2017-11-09 12:53:18.70 Server      (c) Microsoft Corporation.

2017-11-09 12:53:18.70 Server      All rights reserved.

2017-11-09 12:53:18.70 Server      Server process ID is 4120.

2017-11-09 12:53:18.70 Server      Logging SQL Server messages in file ‘/var/opt/mssql/log/errorlog’.

2017-11-09 12:53:18.70 Server      Registry startup parameters: 

-d /var/opt/mssql/data/master.mdf

-l /var/opt/mssql/data/mastlog.ldf

-e /var/opt/mssql/log/errorlog

2017-11-09 12:53:18.70 Server      Command Line Startup Parameters:

-m

Output omitted…

2017-11-09 12:53:19.50 spid4s      SQL Server started in single-user mode. This an informational message only. No user action is required.

Output omitted…

2017-11-09 12:53:19.90 spid4s      Always On Availability Groups was not started because the SQL Server instance is running in single-user mode.  This is an informational message.  No user action is required.

Output omitted…

2017-11-09 12:53:20.62 spid4s      Recovery is complete. This is an informational message only. No user action is required.


From here, you can go about what ever task it is you needed single user mode for.
 
Administering SQL Server on Linux is a new world, learn the operating system, administration fundamentals and more with me at my online course “SQL Server on Linux: Install, Configure, and Manage” at Brent Ozar Unlimited – sign up now here!

SQL Server on Linux Online Training with Brent Ozar Unlimited!

I’m proud to announce to you that I’m partnering with the folks over a Brent Ozar Unlimited to provide live, instructor-led training directly to you online!

Course – SQL Server on Linux: Install, Configure, and Manage

Description

You’ve been managing SQL Server configuration, backups, and troubleshooting for a couple of years, but that was on Windows. Now, you’re looking at implementing SQL Server 2017 on Linux.

Things are different on Linux.

You want to learn enough Linux to be a good DBA – to install, configure, monitor, and troubleshoot SQL Server on Linux.

I’ve been using Linux in production since y2k was a thing, and I can help. I’m Anthony Nocentino, a Microsoft Data Platform MVP. It feels like I’ve been training for this all my life, and I can finally combine my nearly two decades of Linux experience with my SQL Server expertise to get you up to speed, fast!

In this workshop we’ll dive into SQL on Linux and get things started

  • Linux Fundamentals for DBAs
  • SQL Server on Linux Installation and Configuration
  • SQL on Linux Fundamentals such as SQLPAL and SQLOSv2
  • Administering and Configuring SQL Server on Linux
  • Configuration Best Practices
  • High Availability and Disaster Recovery Options

This is an online class – I’m hosting it in GoToWebinar, live on webcam, taking questions as we go through the material together.

Head on over and sign up now!

ANTHONYfinal1

Figure 1: Not joining A-ha! But hoping you have lots of “a-ha” moments during training.

New Pluralsight Course – SQL Server on Linux Administration Fundamentals

New Pluralsight Course – SQL Server on Linux Administration Fundamentals

My new course “SQL Server on Linux Administration Fundamentals” in now available on Pluralsight here! If you want to learn about the course, check out the trailer here or if you want to dive right in check it out here!
 
This course targets DBAs that design and maintain SQL Server on Linux systems (or those evaluating the technology). This course can be used by both the seasoned DBA to learn foundational Linux skills and also what’s new and different when running SQL Server on Linux. 

Course Description

SQL Server is available on Linux, and management wants you to leverage this shift in technology to more effectively manage your data platform. In this course, SQL Server on Linux Administration Fundamentals, you’ll delve into SQL on Linux in order for you to become an effective DBA.  First, you’ll explore an overview of its architecture, installation, and configuration. Next, you’ll learn how to administer SQL Server on Linux. Finally, you’ll discover high availability and disaster recovery options available to you for keeping your SQL Server online. By the end of this course, you’ll have a solid foundation necessary to utilize SQL Server on Linux in production.

The modules of the course are:

  • Introduction and SQL Server Architecture – Introduce the viewer into world of SQL Server on Linux. Why did Microsoft do this? What’s the strategy? Introduce the SQL Server Ecosphere, such as the database engine, SQL Server Agent and SSIS.
  • Installing and Configuring SQL Server on Linux – We’ll look at our installation and configuration options for SQL Server on Linux, introducing Linux package managers and repositories and install SQL Server on Linux and it’s components.
  • Administering Linux for DBAs – We’ll look at managing services with systemd and how to query journald’s log files for information about SQL Server.  Also dive into file ownership, disk partitioning concepts and mounting file systems and remote file systems.
  • Managing SQL Server on Linux: Administration and Tools – Now that the viewer knows where things are in this new operating system, let’s move up the stack and look at the tooling available for SQL Server on Linux. We’ll cover VS Code, SSMS, SQLCMD and DBFS.
  • High Availability and Disaster Recovery with SQL Server on Linux – Dive into the High Availability and Disaster Recovery options available to SQL Server on Linux
     

Pluralsight Redhat Linux

Check out the course at Pluralsight!