Monthly Archives: May 2018

Linux LFCE Learning Path Available at Pluralsight

I’m proud to announce the completion of my first Pluralsight Learning Path. This learning path is built to advance your Linux knowledge to the system administrator or system engineer level. In this series of courses you’ll learn the theory behind how things work and also practice demonstrations and tips to really nail home the things you need to know to run production Linux systems. 

The learning objectives of this series align with the Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE) certification “Domains and Competencies” however these courses will be very valuable to your development as a Linux professional even if you’re not interested in certification.

Thanks and good luck with your studies! 

Check out the path here – Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE)

  • LFCE: Advanced Linux Networking – this course is the network primer for the Linux professional, covering the OSI model, IP addressing, ARP and DNS, IP routing, routing on Linux, TCP internals and what to look for with things go wrong.
     
  • LFCE: Advanced Network and System Administration – in this course you’ll dive into managing network services with systemd, monitoring system performance, advanced package management and sharing data with NFS and Samba.
     
  • LFCE: Network and Host Security – here, you’ll look at security concepts, using iptables and TCP wrappers, firewalld, using OpenSSH and remote access tools and techniques.
     
  • LFCE: Linux Service Management HTTP Services – This course is all about Internet architecture and HTTP services. Installing, securing, SSL certificates and troubleshooting Apache.
     
  • LFCE: Linux Service Management Advanced HTTP Services – In this course you’ll learn how to build scalable Internet architectures with techniques like proxying and caching with Squid, we’ll also cover implementing advanced Apache features with modules.
     
  • LFCE: Linux Service Management Advanced Email Services – In this course, you will learn common email architectures, and you will explore installing Postfix. After that, you will look at common SMTP scenarios and learn how to secure email relay services and provide clients access to email with IMAP.

    Pluralsight logo vrt color 2

Installing OpenSSH Server on Windows 10

So in yesterday’s post we learned that the OpenSSH client is included with the Windows 10, Update 1803!  Guess, what else is included in this server, an OpenSSH Server! Yes, that’s right…you can now run an OpenSSH server on your Windows 10 system and get a remote terminal! So in this post, let’s check out what we need to do to get OpenSSH Server up and running.

First, we’ll need to ensure we update the system to Windows 10, Update 1803. Do that using your normal update mechanisms.

With that installed, let’s check out the new Windows Capabilities (Features) available in this Update, we can use PowerShell to search through them.

Now to install OpenSSH server, we can use the Add-WindowsCapability cmdlet

To confirm it’s installation we can use the Get-WindowsCapability cmdlet again, and this time it’s state is “Installed”

With that installed, let’s take a look at where sshd lives on our Windows system and that’s in C:\Windows\System32\OpenSSH\

On Windows systems, network daemons run as “Services”. We can see with the Get-Service cmdlet, the installer added ssd and also ssh-agent!

As you can see the state is stopped, so let’s start the Services and also set them to start on boot

We can use netstat to see if we’re up and running

So now that it’s up and running, you should know that the configuration files and host keys live in ProgramData\ssh\ so if you need to change the behavior of SSH you’ll head for the sshd_config file and when finished, restart your service with Restart-Service -Name sshd 

You’ll likely need to open your Windows firewall, which can be done with the following cmdlet on PowerShell 5.1

So let’s test it out, I’m going to ssh from my Mac into my Windows 10 laptop

And that’s it, you can now install OpenSSH server on your Windows 10 system. I can only imagine it’s a matter of time before this hits the server side of things! Bravo PowerShell Team, bravo!

OpenSSH is now Part of Windows!

Today is a big day! The OpenSSH client version 7.6p1 is now part of the Windows 10 operating system! Microsoft released Windows 10 Update 1803 and included in that release is the OpenSSH client, which is installed as part of the update.

That’s right an SSH client as part of the Windows operating system by default! Also included with this update is the OpenSSH Server which is included as an Windows Feature on Demand.

Let’s take a look at what this is all made of!

Start off by updating your system to Windows 10, version 1803. You can do this via your normal Windows Update mechanism.

Here you see I have installed Windows 10, version 1803.

Screen Shot 2018 05 16 at 8 07 53 PM

With that, let’s look at what we got in the update! We’ll search our Windows Capabilities (Features)

Cool, so we know OpenSSH is installed, but where? Let’s check out C:\Windows\System32\OpenSSH\

Let’s look a littler closer at the ssh.exe

So this looks like all of the usual suspects in an OpenSSH installation. But it does look like sshd.exe and ssh_config_default came along for the ride during the update even though we didn’t install the OpenSSH.Server Feature!  More on that in my next blog post…

A big shoutout goes out to the PowerShell team for making this happen, check out the project on GitHub. The code is here and the issues and releases are here!

Speaking at SQLSaturday Atlanta – 733

Speaking at SQLSaturday Atlanta!

I’m proud to announce that I will be speaking at SQL Saturday Atlanta on May 17th 2018! This one won’t let you down! Check out the amazing schedule!

If you don’t know what SQLSaturday is, it’s a whole day of free SQL Server training available to you at no cost!

If you haven’t been to a SQLSaturday, what are you waiting for! Sign up now!

My presentation is Monitoring Linux Performance for the SQL Server Admin” 

SQLSaturday #733 - Atlanta 2018

Here’s the abstract for the talk

So you’re a SQL Server administrator and you just installed SQL Server on Linux. It’s a whole new world. Don’t fear, it’s just an operating system. It has all the same components Windows has and in this session we’ll show you that. We will look at the Linux operating system architecture and show you where to look for the performance data you’re used to! Further we’ll dive into SQLPAL and how it architecture and internals enables high performance for your SQL Server. By the end of this session you’ll be ready to go back to the office and have a solid understanding of performance monitoring Linux systems and SQL on Linux. We’ll look at the core system components of CPU, Disk, Memory and Networking monitoring techniques for each and look some of the new tools available including new DMVs and DBFS.Prerequisites: Operating system fundamentals, process, memory and disk concepts.