Category Archives: Redhat

New Pluralsight Course – LFCE: Advanced Network and System Administration

My new course “LFCE: Advanced Network and System Administration” in now available on Pluralsight here! If you want to learn about the course, check out the trailer here or if you want to dive right in check it out here!

This course targets IT professionals that design and maintain RHEL/CentOS based enterprises. It aligns with the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS) and Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE) and also Redhat’s RHCSA and RHCE certifications. The course can be used by both the IT pro learning new skills and the senior system administrator preparing for the certification exam

Let’s take your LINUX sysadmin skills to the next level and get you started on your LFCS/LFCE learning path.

If you’re in the SQL Server community and want to learn how Linux manage system services and performance this course is for you too! You have heard that Microsoft is going to release a version of SQL Server for Linux, right, if not…read this!

The modules of the course are:

  • Managing Network Services – Dive deep into how system systemd manages services and it’s other components
  • Monitoring System Performance – We look at core OS performance attributes for CPU, Disk IO and Memory utilization and how to monitor those
  • Advanced Package Management – Learn how to manage software on your systems and packaging your own RPMs for deployment in your data centers
  • Configuring and Managing Network File System – If you haven’t used NFS before watching this, you will after this module!
  • Configuring and Managing Samba – Get Linux to talk Windows and both share and access Samba resources.

Pluralsight Redhat Linux

Check out the course at Pluralsight!

New Pluralsight Course – LFCE: Advanced Linux Networking

My new course LFCE: Advanced Linux Networking in now available on Pluralsight here!

This course targets IT professionals that design and maintain RHEL based enterprises. It aligns with the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS) and Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE) and also Redhat’s RHCSA and RHCE certifications The course can be used by both the IT pro learning new skills and the senior system administrator preparing for the certification exam

This course will dive deeper into the internals of networking, giving the you insight into how things work under the hood in Linux based networks.

Let’s take your LINUX sysadmin skills to the next level and get you started on your LFCS/LFCE learning path.

If you’re in the SQL Server community and want to learn how to use the command line on Linux, this course is for you too! You heard that Microsoft is going to release a version of SQL Server for Linux right, if not…read this!

The modules of the course are:

  • Network Topology Fundamentals and the OSI Model
  • Internet Protocol – Addressing and Subnetting Fundamentals
  • Internet Protocol – ARP and DNS Fundamentals
  • Internet Protocol – Routing Packets
  • Routing Packets with Linux
  • Investigating TCP Internals
  • Troubleshooting Network Issues

Pluralsight Redhat Linux

Check out the course at Pluralsight!

Hello World on .NET Core

The developments over the last few months in the data community had brought us to an interesting place. We’re going to have SQL on Linux and now we also have .NET on Linux too! While the implications of this are unclear, and worthy of significant prognostication…I’m going to take this time to show you how to get started with .NET Core on a Redhat Enterprise Linux Based System.

First up you’re going to need Redhat Enterprise Linux. The Redhat Developer Suite, now includes a free license of RHEL go get it on Redhat’s site.

Getting Started with Hello World

Once RHEL is installed, the first thing you need to do is enable the .NET repository. On a RHEL system, a repository is a collection of RPMs that can be installed on your computer. RPM is simply a software packaging mechanism that allows you to easily install, uninstall or upgrade software on your computer. So to enable the repository, we use a command named subscription manager to do that for us.

All we did there was enable the repository, which gives us access to the software in that repository, let’s go ahead and actually install .NET Core now. .NET Core leverages Software Collections to help manage concurrent versions of software on a system. So we’ll need to install scl-utils too. To do that that we use yum which will search the enabled repositories on our system and install the rpms specified and all of their dependencies.

Now let’s use scl to hop into the .NET programming environment. This is going to take you into another bash shell with specific environment settings for developing in .NET Core.

Let’s create a directory for our hello world application live in and change into it…

The command used to interact with .NET is simply dotnet. It has several parameters for .NET program management. First up, for our demo is creating a new .NET project, to do that we use the command dotnet new. This command creates a basic project definition in project.json and will create a file Program.cs in the current working directory. Program.cs will already have the code for our Hello World app, easy right? So let’s go ahead and run that command and get everything started.

Output:

Created new C# project in /root/HelloWorld.

 

With our project and files in place we need to tell .NET Core to load any dependencies for the project. This also places a lock on the project. If you skip this step, the next step will fail.

Output:

log  : Restoring packages for /root/HelloWorld/project.json…

log  : Writing lock file to disk. Path: /root/HelloWorld/project.lock.json

log  : /root/HelloWorld/project.json

log  : Restore completed in 627ms.

Everything is in place let’s compile and execute our program

Output:

Project HelloWorld (.NETCoreApp,Version=v1.0) will be compiled because expected outputs are missing

Compiling HelloWorld for .NETCoreApp,Version=v1.0

Compilation succeeded.

    0 Warning(s)

    0 Error(s)

Time elapsed 00:00:01.9394202

 

Hello World!

 

And that’s it, like I said…interesting times in the computer world right now. This convergence of technology titans will certainly lead us to some cool places.

Need More Help?

Need some help installing RHEL or want to learn how bash works? Check out my Pluralsight Course “Understanding and Using Essential Tools for Enterprise Linux 7

Contact Me

Twitter @nocentino
 
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References:
https://www.microsoft.com/net/core#redhat
https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en/net-core/1.0/getting-started-guide/chapter-1-install-net-core-100-on-red-hat-enterprise-linux

Upcoming Course – LFCE: Advanced Linux Networking

I’m pleased to announce that I’m working on a new course for Pluralsight.

The course is titled LFCE: Advanced Linux Networking.

This course targets IT professionals that design and maintain Linux based enterprises. It aligns with the Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE) objectives and can be used by both the IT pro learning new skills and the senior system administrator preparing for the certification exam. This course will dive deeper into the internals of networking, giving the viewer insight into how things work under the hood in Linux based networks.

The modules of the course are:

  • Network Topology Fundamentals and the OSI Model
  • Internet Protocol – Addressing and Subnetting Fundamentals
  • Internet Protocol – ARP and DNS Fundamentals
  • Internet Protocol – Routing Packets
  • Routing Packets with Linux
  • Investigating TCP Internals
  • Troubleshooting Network Issues – Layer 1 – 3
  • Troubleshooting Network Issues – Layer 4 – 7

Pluralsight

The course is projected to be released last July, I’ll keep you posted!

New Pluralsight Course – Understanding and Using Essential Tools in Enterprise Linux 7

My new course “Understanding and Using Essential Tools in Enterprise Linux 7” in now available on Pluralsight here!

This course targets IT professionals that design and maintain RHEL based enterprises. It aligns with RHCSA and RHCE objectives and can be used by both the IT pro learning new skills and the senior system administrator preparing for the certification exam

Let’s take your LINUX sysadmin skills to the next level and get you started on your RHCSA/RHCE learning path. 

If you’re in the SQL Server community and want to learn how to use the command line on Linux, this course is for you too! You heard that Microsoft is going to release a version of SQL Server for Linux right, if not…read this!

The modules of the course are:

  • Installing Redhat Enterprise Linux
  • Understanding Command Execution in the Bash Shell
  • Managing Files and File Compression
  • Using the VI Text Editor
  • Configuring and Managing File Permissions
  • Advanced Shell Topics and Searching for Text in Files
  • Finding Help

Pluralsight Redhat Linux

Check out the course at Pluralsight!

Pluralsight Authoring – Upcoming Course

I am super excited to announce that I have recently been accepted as an author for Pluralsight.

My audition was on Monitoring AlwaysOn Availability Groups and was accepted on the first pass :) the clip discussed monitoring replication latency something I’ve blogged about here and here.

In the recent weeks I worked with my editor and we have selecting a course topic “Understanding and Using Essential Tools in Enterprise Linux 7”. This will be the first course in a series of courses that covers the Red Hat Certified System Administrator® (RHCSA) and Red Hat Certified Engineer® (RHCE) certifications. If all goes to plan the course should be completed in late November and published a few weeks after that.

I’m really excited about this opportunity and look forward to helping people learn the skills needed to solve those hard technology challenges…themselves!

The folks at Pluralsight are a great bunch, they truly a pleasure to work with. After seeing these folks in action, it’s no wonder why the quality of their product is so high.

Pluralsight