Category Archives: SQL

Speaking at PASS Summit 2017

I’m very pleased to announce that I will be speaking at PASS Summit 2017!  This is my first time speaking at PASS Summit and I’m very excited to be doing so! What’s more, is I get to help blaze new ground on a emerging technology SQL Server on Linux! My session is Monitoring Linux Performance for the SQL Server Admin so if you’re a Windows or SQL Server administrator, this session is for you. We’ll look at some of the internals of SQL Server on Linux and dive into Linux OS internals and show you where to look inside Linux for most important performance data for your SQL Server. I hope to see you there!

 

Monitoring Linux Performance for the SQL Server Admin

Abstract

So you’re a SQL Server administrator and you just installed SQL Server on Linux. It’s a whole new world. Don’t fear, it’s just an operating system. It has all the same components Windows has and in this session we’ll show you that. We will look at the Linux operating system architecture and show you where to look for the performance data you’re used to! Further we’ll dive into SQLPAL and how it architecture and internals enables high performance for your SQL Server. By the end of this session you’ll be ready to go back to the office and have a solid understanding of performance monitoring Linux systems and SQL on Linux. We’ll look at the core system components of CPU, Disk, Memory and Networking monitoring techniques for each and look some of the new tools available including new DMVs and DBFS.

 

PASS Summit 2017

Reflecting on the Last Year of Microsoft’s OpenSource Technologies

This past year has certainly been interesting in the world of Linux. Microsoft has taken a new strategy and is embracing the open source model. It’s releasing it’s key software products with versions for Linux. It’s truly a remarkable time. In this post I want to highlight some of the bigger events and cover what does this mean to you and where you can go do get some training on these topics.

Here’s some of the highlights from the last year

Microsoft becomes a Platinum Member in the Linux Foundation – this means Microsoft is committing itself to a long term investment in the Open Source community and continuing to develop open source software. Don’t believe me on the Open Source thing…well check out their GitHub repo. Who would have seen this coming? 

Now, let’s Look at the new tools you have to build cross platform applications and develop your systems

  • .NET Core – Literally you can build native .NET applications to run on any platform, Windows, Linux, Mac…Docker!
  • bash Ubuntu on Windows – One of the primary reasons I bought my first Mac years ago was I wanted a bash shell, well now I’m not tied to this hardware anymore. 
  • Visual Studio Code – With all this cross platform stuff, you’ll need a consistent development environment, VS Code runs on Windows, Linux and Mac. And it’s darn nice too. Very extensible with many languages available. 
  • SQL Server on Linux – This is the real deal, it’s fast and consistent with your existing SQL Server experience. I’ve blogged about it a bit :)
  • PowerShell Core – Microsoft adds another management tool to your tool belt with this. Windows, Linux and Mac…can be managed all with one Language. For me, this was mind blowing, I got to do a training video with literally the inventor of PowerShell Jeffrey Snover and MVP Jason Helmick! I blogged about PowerShell a bit too.
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What does this mean to you?

So what’s this mean to you? Get out there and start learning about this stuff and discover how it can impact you. In the coming years new solutions are going to be developed using these components and it’s upon you to train yourself and learn how to leverage these tools to solve problems. 

I’ve spent the last year developing some fun training at Pluralsight I think you should check out. The training is based on the Linux Foundation Certified Engineer curriculum and takes you from installation up to a running Linux system. 

  • Understanding and Using Essential Tools for Enterprise Linux 7 – If you’re new to Linux, start here! This will course will help you install Linux and get oriented with the operating system and the command line interface. 
  • LFCE: Advanced Network and System Administration – Next, you’ll need to learn how to control your system’s services, install packages, manage performance and share data between systems. Check this course out to make your Linux system really work for you
  • LFCE: Advanced Linux Networking – Your systems don’t stand alone, in this course you’ll dive deep into how data moves between Linux systems. Protip, these concepts apply to Windows systems too.
  • LCFE: Network and Host Security – My newest course, let’s learn how to secure our Linux systems from both the networking and host perspective. We’ll cover security concepts and architectures, securing Linux services and take a deep dive into OpenSSH and remote access.
  • LFCE: Linux Service Management – HTTP Services – I’m currently developing a course on HTTP Services – you’ll learn how to install, configure and manage Apache.
  • More to follow – announcements coming up soon! I can’t wait to tell you what’s next.

I’ve got tons of blog posts on these topics, 

So go ahead, get digging in there learn download Linux (yes, I prefer CentOS), install SQL Server and PowerShell and start moving your skills towards where the technology is going to take you!

Speaking at SQLSaturday Sacramento – 650!

Speaking at SQLSaturday Sacramento!

I’m proud to announce that I will be speaking at SQL Saturday Sacramento on July 15th 2017! And wow, 650 SQLSaturdays! This one won’t let you down. Check out the amazing schedule!

If you don’t know what SQLSaturday is, it’s a whole day of free SQL Server training available to you at no cost!

If you haven’t been to a SQLSaturday, what are you waiting for! Sign up now!

SQLSATSAC650

This year I have TWO sessions!

1. Linux OS Fundamentals for the SQL Admin

SQL Server and PowerShell are now available on Linux and management wants you to leverage this shift in technology to more effectively manage your systems, but you’re a Windows admin!  Don’t fear! It’s just an operating system! It has all the same components Windows has and in this session we’ll show you that. We will look at the Linux operating system architecture and show you how to interact with and manage Linux system. By the end of this session you’ll be ready to go back to the office and get started working with Linux with a fundamental understanding of how it works.

2. Designing High Availability Database Systems using AlwaysOn Availability Groups

Are you looking for a high availability solution for your business critical application? You’re heard about AlwaysOn Availability Groups and they seem like a good solution, but you don’t know where to start. It all starts with a solid design. In this session we introduce the core concepts needed to design a Availability Group based system. Covering topics such as recovery objectives, replica placement, failover requirements, synchronization models, quorum, backup and recovery and monitoring. This session is modeled after real world client engagements conducted by Centino Systems that have lead to many successful Availability Groups based systems supporting tier 1 business critical applications.

dbfs – command line access to SQL Server DMVs

With SQL Server on Linux, Microsoft has recognized that they’re opening up their products to a new set of users. People that aren’t used to Windows and it’s tools. In the Linux world we have a set of tools that work with our system performance data and present that to us as text. Specifically, the placeholder for nearly all of the Linux kernel’s performance and configuration data is the /proc virtual file system, procfs. Inside here you can find everything you need that represents the running state of your system. Processes, memory utilization, and disk performance data all of this is presented as files inside of directories inside /proc.

Now, let’s take this idea and extend it to SQL Server. In SQL Server we have DMVs, dynamic management views. These represent to current running state of our SQL Server. SQL Server exposes the data in DMVs as table data that we can query using T-SQL. 

So, Microsoft saw the need to bring these two things together, we can expose the internals of SQL Server and its DMVs to the command line via a virtual file system. And that’s exactly what dbfs does, it exposes all of SQL Server’s DMVs as text files in a directory. When you access one of the text files…you’ll execute query against the SQL Server and the query output comes back to you via standard output to you Linux console. From there you can use any of your Linux command line fu…and do what you want with the data returned. 

Setting up dbfs

So first, let’s go ahead and set this up. I already have the Microsoft SQL Server repo configured so I can install via yum. If you have SQL on Linux installed, you likely already have this repo too. If not, go ahead and follow the repo setup instructions here. To install dbfs we use yum on RHEL based distributions.

First off, think about what’s going on under the hood here…we’re going to allow the system to execute queries against DMVs…so let’s try to keep this as secure as possible, I’m going to create a user that is allowed to only query DMVs with the VIEW SERVER STATE permission. So let’s do that…
 
Let’s log into our SQL Server via SQLCMD
And execute this code to create a user named dbfs_user 

Once created, let’s assign this user permissions to query DMVs
The next step is we need to create a directory where dbfs will place all the files representing the DMVs we wish to query
Now, let’s go ahead and configure dbfs. I’m going to place it’s configuration file in /etc/ since that’s the standard location for configuration files on Linux systems.
And inside that file, let’s use the following configuration. Pretty straight forward. Define a configuration name, here you see server1, the hostname which is the locally installed SQL instance. We’ll use the username and password of the user we just created and also defined is a version. While this isn’t very well documented, the code here shows that if you’re on version 16 (SQL Server 2016) or newer it will create files dbfs files with a .json file extension which exposes your DMV data as…you guessed it JSON. Also if you want to add a second server to dbfs, just repeat the configuration inside the same text file.

Running dbfs

Now with all the preliminaries out of the way, let’s launch dbfs. Basic syntax here, the actual program name with the parameter -c pointing to the configuration file we just created and the -m parameter pointing to the directory we want to “mount” our DMVs into.
Now, what’s interesting about dbfs is if you log out dbfs stays running. Honestly, I don’t like that, if this is the case it should be running as a service managed by systemd or whatever init daemon you’re using on your Linux distribution. I mentioned that on their GitHub repo. If this is going to be a user process, then I should have the choice the background the task myself.

Using dbfs

Looking at the source for dbfs it gets a list of all DMVs from sys.system_views from the SQL Server you configured it to connect to, then creates a file for each and every one of those DMVs. So we have full coverage of all the DMVs available to us and since you can use any bash command line fu to access the data now…the options are really limitless. Microsoft has a few good demos on the GitHub repo here. Let’s walk through a few examples now.
 
Accessing a DMV

This is pretty straight forward, you read from the file just like you would read from any other file on a Linux system. So let’s do that…we add the column -t option to make sure all the columns are aligned in the output.

And our output looks like this…

Notice in the output above how the connect_time column is split incorrectly? We need to tell column to use the tab as a delimiter. By default it uses whitespaces. So let’s do that…
And now our output looks much better

Selecting off a subset of columns

Well you probably noticed that the output is a bit unruly since it’s outputting all of the DMV’s columns. So let’s tame that a bit and pull out particular columns. To do that we’ll use a tool called awk which will print out columns based on the numeric index, so $1 is the first column and so on. 
And our output looks like this
Something isn’t right…as DBAs we think of things in rows and columns. So we’re going to count across the top and think the 7th column is going to yield the 7th column and it’s data for each row, right? Well, it will but data processed by awk is whitespace delimited by default and is processed row by row. So the 7th column in the second line isn’t the same as the output in the first line. This can be really frustrating if your row data has spaces in it…like you know…dates.
 
So let’s fix that…the output from the DMVs via dbfs is tab delimited. We can define our delimiter for awk with -F which will allow for whitespaces in our data. Breaking the data only on the tabs. Let’s hope there isn’t any tabs in our data!
And the output from that looks like this, much better but we don’t have the nice columns.
We’re so close, we can’t throw column on the end to make this nice and columnar because awk with this configuration it will remove the tab delimiters on it’s output stream. column by default will do the same thing too, but we can let column do the work for us and have it print tab delimiters in it’s output stream. 
And voila, we end up with some nice neatly formatted output

Searching in Text

We can search for text in the output using grep, here’s a quick example looking for the dedicated admin connection in dm_os_schedulers
And here’s the output. 

SQL folks…keep in mind, grep will only output lines matched, so we loose the column headers here since they’re part of the standard output stream when accessing the file/DMV data.

Moving forward with dbfs

We need the ability to execute more complex queries from the command line. Vin Yu mentions this here. As DBAs we already have our scripts that we use day to day to help us access, and more importantly make sense of, the data in the DMVs. So dbfs should allow us to execute those scripts somehow. I’m thinking we can have it read a folder on the local Linux system at runtime, create files for those scripts and throw them in the mounted directory and allow them to be accesses like any of the other DMVs. The other option is we place those scripts as views on the server and access them via dbfs. Pros and cons either way. Since it’s open source…I’m thinking about implementing this myself :)

Next is, somehow we need the ability to maintain column context throughout the output stream, for DBAs it’s going to be tough sell having to deal with that. I know JSON is available, but we’re talking about DBAs and sysadmins here as a target audience. 

In closing is a great step forward…giving access into the DMVs from the command line opens up SQL Server to a set of people who are used to accessing performance data this way. Bravo! 

Speaking at SQL Saturday Pensacola!

I’m proud to announce that I will be speaking at SQL Saturday Pensacola on June 3rd 2017! Check out the amazing schedule!

If you don’t know what SQLSaturday is, it’s a whole day of free SQL Server training available to you at no cost!

If you haven’t been to a SQLSaturday, what are you waiting for! Sign up now!

My presentation is Designing High Availability Database Systems using AlwaysOn Availability Groups” 

Abstract:

Are you looking for a high availability solution for your business critical application? You’re heard about AlwaysOn Availability Groups and they seem like a good solution, but you don’t know where to start. It all starts with a solid design. In this session we introduce the core concepts needed to design a Availability Group based system. Covering topics such as recovery objectives, replica placement, failover requirements, synchronization models, quorum, backup and recovery and monitoring. This session is modeled after real world client engagements conducted by Centino Systems that have lead to many successful Availability Groups based systems supporting tier 1 business critical applications.

Learning Objectives: 

This session highlights the importance of doing thorough design work up front. Attendees will learn core concepts needed for successful Availability Group based systems. This includes, recovery objectives, replica placement, failover requirements, synchronization models, quorum, backup and recovery and monitoring. From this session attendees will have a firm footing on where to start when they start designing their AlwaysOn Availability Group based systems.

Why Did Your Availability Group Creation Fail?

Availability Groups are a fantastic way to provide high availability and disaster recovery for your databases, but it isn’t exactly the easiest thing in the world to pull off correctly. To do it right there’s a lot of planning and effort that goes into your Availability Group topology. The funny thing about AGs is as hard as they are to plan…they’re pretty easy to implement…but sometimes things can go wrong. In this post I’m going to show you how to look into things when creating your AGs fails.

When working at a customer site today I encountered and error that I haven’t seen before when creating an Availability Group. So I’m going to walk you through what happened and how I fixed it. So if your AGs fail at creation, you can follow this process to dig into why.

First, let’s try to create our Availability Group

But, that fails and we get this error…it tells me what happened and to go look in the SQL Server error log for more details.

OK, so let’s look in the SQL Server error Log and see what we find.

Clearly something is up, the AG tried to come online but couldn’t.

The error here say check out the Windows Server Failover Clustering log…so let’s go ahead and do that. But that’s not as straightforward as you think. WSFC does write to the event log, but the errors are pretty generic for this issue. Here’s what you’ll see in the System Event Log and the Cluster Events section in the Failover Cluster Manager

Wow, that’s informative, right? Luckily we still have more information to look into.

Let’s dig deeper with using the WSFC cluster logs

The cluster logs need to be queried, they’re not readily available as text for us. We can write them out to file with this PowerShell cmdlet Get-ClusterLogs. Let’s make a directory and dump the logs into there.

Now we have some data to look through!

When we look at the contents of the cluster logs files generates by Get-ClusterLogs, we’re totally on the other side of the spectrum when it comes to information verbosity. The logs so far have been pretty terse and haven’t really told us about what’s causing the failure…well dig through this log and you’ll likely find your reason and a lot more information. Good stuff to look at to get an understanding of the internals of WSFCs. Now for the the reason my Availability Group creation failed was permissions. Check out the log entries.

Well that’s pretty clear about what’s going on…the process creating the AG couldn’t connect to SQL Server to run the very important sp_server_diagnostics stored procedure. A quick internet search to find a fix yielded this article from Mike Fal (b | t) which points to this Microsoft article detailing the issue and fix.

For those that don’t want to click the links here’s the code to adjust the permissions and allow your Availability Group to create.

So to review…here’s how we found our issue.

  1. Read the error the create script gives you
  2. Read the SQL Server error log
  3. Look at your System Event log
  4. Dump your Cluster Logs and review

Use this technique if you find yourself in a situation where your AG won’t come online or worse…fails over unexpectedly or won’t come back online.

Using dbatools for automated restore and CHECKDB

OK, so if you haven’t heard of the dbatools.io project run by Chrissy LeMaire and company…you’ve likely been living under a rock. I strongly encourage you to check it out ASAP. What they’re doing will make your life as a DBA easier…immediately. Here’s an example…

One of the things I like to do as a DBA is backup my databases, restore them to another server and run CHECKDB on them. There are some cmdlets in the dbatools project, in particular the Snowball release, that really make this easy. In this post I’m going to outline a quick solution I had to throw together this week to help me achieve this goal. We’ve all likely written code to do this using any number of technologies and techniques…wait until you see how easy it is using the dbatools project.

Requirements

  1. Automation – Complete autopilot, no human interaction.
  2. Report job status – Accurate reporting in the event the job failed, the CHECKDB failed or the restore failed.

Solution

  1. Use dbaltools cmdlets for restore and CHECKDB operations
  2. Use SQL Agent Job automation, logging and alerting

So let’s walk through this implementation together.

Up first, here’s the PowerShell script used to restore and CHECKDB the database. Save this code into a file named restore_databses.ps1

Let’s what through what’s going on here. First the line with $ErrorActionPreference = “Stop” that’s crucial because it will tell our script to stop when it encounters and error. Yes, that’s what I want. The job stops and the error from the cmdlets will reach the SQL Agent job we have driving the process. Using this, the job will fail, and I’ll have a nice log telling me exactly what happened.

Next we have some variables set, including the backup path and the location of the data and log files on the destination system.

Now, here’s the Restore-DbaDatabase cmdlet from the dbatools project, this cmdlet will traverse the backup path defined in -Path parameter, find all the backups and build the restore sequence for you. Yes…really! If you don’t define a parameter defining a point in time it will build a restore sequence using the most recent backups available in the share. The next few parameters define the destination data and log directories and tell the restore to overwrite the database if the database exists on the destination server. That next parameter tells the job to ignore using log backups. This is sufficient in my implementation because I’m running full backups daily, I don’t need the point in time recovery. You might, so give it a try. CHECKDB can take a long time…the final parameter, tells Invoke-SqlCmd2 not to timeout while running its query.

Now, I need to run some T-SQL to clean up the databases, for example, I change the recovery model, then shrink the log. This is so I don’t have a bunch of production sized log files laying around on the destination system I do this after each restore, this way I can save a little space. And finally, I run CHECKDB against the database.

If you want to do this for more than one database, you could easily parameterize this code and drive the process with a loop. You’re creative…give it a try.

Now, I take all this and wrap it up in a SQL Agent job.

SQL Agent Job Step

 Figure 1: SQL Agent Job Step Definition

Using a SQL Agent job, we get automation, reporting and alerting. I’ll know average run times, if the job fails and have a log of why and it sends me an email with the job’s results.

The SQL Agent job type is set to Operating system (CmdExec), rather than PowerShell. We run the job this way because we want to use the latest version of PowerShell installed on our system. In this case its version 5.1. The SQL Agent PowerShell job step on SQL 2012 I believe uses version 4 and when I used it, it wasn’t able to load the dbatools modules.

We need to ensure we install the dbatools as administrator. This way the module is available to everyone on the system, including the SQL Agent user, not just the user installing the module. Simply run a PowerShell session as administrator and use Install-Module dbatools. If you need more assistance check out this for help.

From a testing standpoint I confirmed the following things…

  1. When a restore fails, it’s logged to the SQL Agent job’s log, I get an alert.
  2. When one of the Invoke-SqlCmd2 calls fails, it’s logged to the SQL Agent job’s log and I get an alert.
  3. When CHECKDB finds a corruption in a database, it’s logged to the SQL Agent job’s log, the SQL Server Error Log and I get an alert. For testing this I used Paul Randal’s corrupt databases which he has available here.

So in this post, we discussed a solution to common DBA problem, backup, restore and CHECKDB a set of databases. Using dbatools, you can do this with a very simple solution like I described here. I like simple. Simple is easier to maintain. Certainly there are some features I want to add to this. Specifically, I’d like to write some more verbose information into the SQL Agent job’s log or use the job step’s ability to log to a file. Using those logs I can easily review the exact runtimes of each restore and CHECKDB.

Give dbatools a try. You won’t be disappointed…really go there now!

Speaking at SQLSaturday Chicago – 600!

Speaking at SQLSaturday Chicago!

I’m proud to announce that I will be speaking at SQL Saturday Chicago on March 11th 2017! And wow, 600 SQLSaturdays! This one won’t let you down. Check out the amazing schedule!

If you don’t know what SQLSaturday is, it’s a whole day of free SQL Server training available to you at no cost!

If you haven’t been to a SQLSaturday, what are you waiting for! Sign up now!

My presentation is Networking Internals for the SQL Server Professional” 

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Here’s the abstract for the talk

Once data leaves your SQL Server do you know what happens or is the world of networking a black box to you? Would you like to know how data is packaged up and transmitted to other systems and what to do when things go wrong?  Are  you tired of being frustrated with the network team? In this session we introduce how data moves between systems on networks and TCP/IP internals. We’ll discuss real world scenarios showing you how your network’s performance impacts the performance of your SQL Server and even your recovery objectives.

Friend of Redgate – 2017

I’m excited to announce that I have been named a Friend of Redgate for 2017. The program targets influential people in their respective technical communities such as SQL, .NET and ALM and enables us to participate in the conversation around product and community development.

As a multi-year awardee in the program I get to see first hand the continuing dedication Redgate has to the SQL community and to making great software. I met a ton of really cool, very dedicated people along the way. Thanks for the recognition and I look forward to another great year!

Redgate makes outstanding products! While I focus mainly on the DBA side of things such as SQL Monitor, SQL Backup and SQL Prompt there are many more. I’ve used these tools for years and let’s just say they’re awesome.

Redgate isn’t just software, they’re committed to community and education. Here are some of the things they do to support technical communities:

  • Online resources – SimpleTalkSQL Server Central, and books and Free eBooks. These resources aren’t marketing fluff, it’s killer content written by real experts
  • Events – hosting events, exhibiting at events and supporting user groups across the world. One word can describe this, engaged
Thank you to Redgate for this opportunity! I look forward to participating in this program, sharing my thoughts and learning as much as I can from all involved.
FoRG 2017
If you need you’d like to talk about Redgate’s products and where they fit into your SQL Server system please feel free to contact me.
 
Follow me on Twitter: @nocentino

Monitoring SLAs with SQL Monitor Reporting

Proactive Reporting for SQL Server

If you’re a return reader of this blog you know I write often about monitoring and performance of Availability Groups. I’m a very big proponent of using monitoring techniques to ensure you’re meeting your service level agreements in terms of recovery time objective and recovery point objective. In my in person training sessions on “Performance Monitoring AlwaysOn Availability Groups”, I emphasize the need for knowing what your system’s baseline for healthy replication and knowing when your system deviates from that baseline. From a monitoring perspective, there are really two key concepts here I want to dig into…reactive monitoring and proactive monitoring.

Reactive Monitoring

Reactive monitoring is configuring a metric, setting thresholds for alerting and reacting when you get the alert. This type of monitoring is critical to the operations of your system. The alerts we configure should model the healthy state of our system…when our system deviates outside of that state, we certainly want to know about that so that we can act…well really react accordingly.

Proactive Monitoring

Proactive monitoring with an alert based monitoring tool is a little harder. What DBAs and architects do is periodically sit down and go through their existing monitoring systems and review the data over some time interval. And if we’re honest with ourselves we try to do this at regular intervals but don’t get to it very often because we’re busy. And when we do finally get in there to look it’s usually to do a post mortem on some sort of production issue…then very often we find that a critical performance attribute had been slowly creeping up over time until it reached a tipping point and caused a production issue. We do our analysis, make our system corrections and move on. Still not exactly proactive. Mostly because there is still a person in the process.

Reporting on System State

With our Reactive Monitoring model, we already define what a health system state is. And let’s take people out of the equation. In Redgate’s latest release of SQL Monitor they added a reporting module. In here you can define reports that will represent the state of your system and you can get a snapshot view of what’s critical to you about your SQL Server environment. So if you are running Availability Groups, like I mentioned above, you can configure your report to have those critical performance metrics already set up so you can quickly get to them via the SQL Monitor interface. But better yet, you can schedule the report to be delivered right to your inbox. Yes, another email. But the report is a simple PDF…you give it a glance, process the data and move on. This saves you from having to go into SQL Monitor’s web interface to view the state of your system. Find something odd, jump into the Web UI and start digging for the root cause.

Reporting gives us two key advantages

  1. Point in time snapshots of our system’s health – we’ll get that report dropped into our mailbox and on that report is the most critical performance metrics that define the health of our system.
  2. Ability to see slowly changing trends – reporting helps us focus on trends. It allows us to zoom out a bit and view our system over time. Less reacting, more “proacting”

OK and one more…for me, as a consultant, I can define reports for clients and have them emailed to me periodically to review. Let’s take a second to build a simple report together

Creating Your Own Reports

Now normally, I’d show you a bunch of screenshots on how to create a report in SQL Monitor…but rather than do that…go head and click on the menu below and start trying out the reporting interface yourself using Redgate’s publicly available SQL Monitor Demo Site! 

Screen Shot 2017 02 06 at 11 47 32 AM

A couple reports I think you should look at right away are

  1. Example Report – this is the landing page on the demo site and as you can see we get a snapshot of our servers’ performance.
  2. SCC – Custom Metrics – in SQL Monitor you can add your own custom metrics, these are things that you think are business critical…the report in the demo site shows you SQLServerCentral custom metrics of Emails Sent per Hour and Forum Posts per Hour.
  3. Storage – here you’ll find things like fastest filling disk, disk space used, and database sizes. 
  4. Create Your Own – Download the trial version and create your own report. What are the things that are important to you that you want to have right at your fingertips when you log in or have a report land in your inbox with that data?
In closing, know that your monitoring strategy should take into account both types of monitoring, reactive and proactive so you can ensure you’re meeting your service levels. Start pushing things into the proactive category as much as possible. Leverage SQL Monitor’s reporting to better understand the state of your system.